Tbilisi architecture biennial

online

28.10.20


Architecture in the age of planetary crisis: from the tragedy of commons to new practices of commoning. 


Garrett Hardin's 1968 paper, 'The Tragedy of the Commons,' remains one of the most controversial texts illustrating humans' inability to sustain a common resource pool. The argument set out there became a catalyst for research on collective action, unpacking contradictions in various forms of ownership and governance. It has gained particular resonance in recent years as certain actors began to look for a response to climate change - usually referred to as the endgame of the Tragedy - at different levels of governance and across spatial scales.


Existing attempts to reverse the planetary climate crises and to envision an undoing of the Tragedy—as manifest through architectural imagery, development concepts, and international agreements—not only fall short of creating viable solutions, but more significantly, fail to articulate a collective imaginary around which action might even be organized in the first place. At stake in this failure is a crisis of agency and imagination—where individual responsibility is often championed at the expense of planetary accountability.


Rather than reproducing existing configurations of power and agency to prop-up the world as we know it, this panel looks to open up new epistemological frameworks for understanding the conditions and contradictions of our troubled present. Departing from an understanding of the “Tragedy”, this panel brings together projects and papers that explore the intricate relationship between architecture, scenario planning, resource ownership, and our understanding of the planetary crisis. It aims to ask questions as to how, or if, architecture can act on a planetary scale, and, more fundamentally, how the notion of planetarity as a condition of commoning informs architectural practice in the age of climate crises.


Curated by Elena Darjania (Georgia). Special thanks to Jesse Vogler.  


Kosmos Law

Vlad Afanasiev, Luiza Crosman


Kosmos Law proposes a holistic legal framework and a new model of terrestrial governance that matches planetary conditions and planetary governance as a way to reverse current climate change conditions. The project examines the history of land occupation on Earth and exploration of outer space to delineate how international laws and policies are usually shaped by influential actors - single countries driven by their national interests and/or domestic powerful players. This set up jeopardizes justness of these legal and political frameworks when applied at a planetary scale. And current climate crises is a vivid example of this system. In response, by exposing the relations between space and terrestrial legal frameworks, Kosmos law envisions how certain values - such as the notion of commons - defined for outer space exploration can reshape the analog activities on the Earth. By arguing that Earth is a subset of space, Kosmos law not only regulates future space activities but also envisions them as an indispensable part of the Earth's ecosystem governance.


Credits:

Team: Vlad Afanasiev, Luiza Crosman, Elena Darjania

Music: Valesuchi

Special thanks to: Rachel Hill, Maria Gavrysh


The project was developed during The Terraforming program at Strelka Institute

Program Director: Benjamin H. Bratton

Program Tutors: Nicolay Boyadjiev, Lisa Dorrer

Cassandra

Chiara Di Leone, Laura Cugusi, Anastasiia Noga


Cassandra is a research collective that investigates institutional practices and formal structures that emerge in the field of ecosystem governance. It explores how climate change is not only constructed through discourse and rhetoric, but produced through protocols of action, gestures, rituals and choreographies that corporate and state institutions routinely perform.


In Building Earth's Futures, Cassandra imagines a different way of conceiving the future habitability of Earth. It departs from the existing frameworks of scenario planning, which governmental and corporate entities use to strategize in the face of the ongoing climate collapse. Instead, it moves into the realm where past, present and future are intertwined in a complex mesh of cause and effect, addressing the climate narratives that are written before projections and after modelling. 


Most recently, Cassandra’s research has been focused on complex temporalities, the blurring of the boundaries between physical and digital spaces (between speculation and reality), and the possibility of shaping a future that is already here through the recursive power of sensing technologies and institutional action.


Credits:

Team: Chiara Di Leone, Laura Cugusi, Anastasiia Noga.

Virtual Environment: GVN 908

Graphic Design: 0ffsh0re and Ongoing Projects

Music: Claude Speed

Voice: Malak Helmy


The project was developed during The Terraforming program at Strelka Institute

Program Director: Benjamin H. Bratton

Program Tutors: Nicolay Boyadjiev, Lisa Dorrer

(Re)making Anaklia - the Architecture of Ruin

Tekla Aslanishvili, Evelina Gambino.


Our lecture performance intermixes excerpts from Tekla Aslanishvili’s documentary ‘Algorithmic Island’ with insights from our fieldwork around the planned logistical hub of Anaklia, in West Georgia, bordering the de facto state of Abkhazia. Throughout the past decade, this coastal village has been at the centre of multiple waves of investment aimed at turning it into a key node for commerce, infrastructure and tourism. The few kilometres of coast that compose the village are today dotted with the material residues of such spectacular attempts at constructing a prosperous future for Georgia. These are architectures of different kinds: institutional buildings, ornamental sculptures, temporary structures never removed, private houses, abandoned building sites, interrupted boulevards and more. Looking at these diverse constructions we speak of the multiple future expectations that converged into this territory. Rather than an unique vision, the future from Anaklia appears as a continuous process of trial and error. It is a future made of different practices, materials, actors, visions and hopes, where positive and negative turns of events are bound together by speculation. Across the globe, corporate, institutional and governmental actors alike, are rejecting the need for a deep transformation of the mode of production, accumulation and extraction that has gifted us with the Anthropocene. Observing Anaklia, we see how this hunt for technopolitical fixes to grant the longevity of profit against an increasingly global horizon of catastrophe has already turned the village into the site of a restless scramble amidst the ruins of what’s left of our future.

Speculative Imperialism in the Age of Natural Violence - Ross Exo Adams

This talk explores the changing status of urbanism in an age shaped by risk and instability. It does so by recognizing that much of the contemporary responses to the instabilities of our world seem to have found simultaneously a subject, object and site of intervention in the human body. Under the umbrella of ‘resilience’, the viability of contemporary urbanism rests on documenting, measuring and distributing vulnerability globally while projecting the body’s particular vulnerability onto the everyday spaces and textures of life in an unstable world. By exploring an emerging complex of interrelated research initiatives and design projects, I will argue that resilience names a meta-project that operates as both a technique for reimagining the body in an ecology of algorithmic governance and a global initiative to reimagine large scale urban development in the age of undifferentiated crisis. Through a network of power built on the confluence of private foundations and multinational firms, global governance frameworks, university research ‘laboratories’ and municipal governments, resilience has come to identify a new kind of ‘pre-emptive’ developmentalism—a renewed urban entrepreneurialism re-coded with the language humanitarian aid, whose imperial overtones should not be overlooked: as with classical forms of imperialism, the dispensation of vulnerability has long justified the violence of dispossession and the imposition of colonial and patriarchal modes of rule. In this space, the projection of a future as a theater of unevenly distributed ‘natural’ violence offers the basic set of data points for new, speculative forms of enclosure to unfold worldwide.

zoom
in / out
scroll through
programme
rotate
building
move one floor
up / down
reset building
rotate
building
zoom
in / out
drag
building
zoom
in / out
scroll through
programme
rotate
building
move one floor
up / down
reset building
rotate
building
zoom
in / out
drag
building
navigation tutorial